jump to navigation

Trust in media is about credibility not truth, placing journalists at a disadvantage vs. bloggers 5/13/08

Posted by Steve Boriss in Trust.
trackback

In his excellent book Can You Trust the Media?, Adrian Monck suggests that with the advent of TV, audiences discovered a new way to determine whether news outlets could be trusted. It was no longer a matter of simply weighing the outlet’s track record for delivering “truth,” i.e. for making statements that survived the rigors of reality testing. It was now about “credibility,” and Monck cites Neil Postman’s position that this is a matter of the news-teller’s perceived “sincerity, authenticity, vulnerability, or attractiveness.”

This highlights another frustration newspaper journalists now suffer. Many claim the single most important advantage they have over bloggers, if not their justification for survival, is their ability to deliver truth. But bloggers who are unconstrained by the cold, objective, impersonal style required by Modern Journalism can more easily present themselves as more credible — sincere, authentic, and vulnerable. Worse yet, Modern Journalism almost requires journalists to sacrifice their credibility by insisting they always publish the truth and are objective, false claims regularly exposed by the Internet. Journalism has a credibility gap, and it must release its grip from cherished, but false ideals to narrow it.

Comments»

1. Blogiest links I could find #5 — The Local - 5/18/08

[…] I collect so many blogging links during general www surfing that instead of doing a proper post on each one I find a quick linkblog about blogging satisfies my desire to announce them to the Aussosphere. 1. A successful entrepreneur has vowed to give up public speaking and focus more on blogging 2. A heartening story that despite the great firewall of china, 20 per cent of bestselling books in China now stem from online literature like blogs. The interesting thing I take from this is that in countries like Australia that already have an established publishing industry structure very few books originate from an online form and are turned into books. Local publishers need to wake up to some o the gold that exist online. 3. A quick guide on finding images to use in your blog posts. 4. While I can’t say I have read or heard anyone specifically say micro-blogging tools like Twitter or online social networks were going to bring about blogging’s demise. Still, one of the Aussie Bloggers has outlined a strong case to why blogging won’t be a replaced anytime soon. 5. There’s another push for a blogging code. This time by a UK law firm. They’ve published a lot of stats about how unaware of legal issues people are but very little detail on their proposed code. 6. Back in the day (’98 + ‘99) there used to be a online service called Web Site Garage that was run by Netscape where you could put your site through to evaluate a number of factors before publishing to the web. One of the features I appreciated most was the spell check. For some reason the whole service went offline and was never replaced. Until now. There’s a soon to be launched service called Spellr.us that will offer a free spell checking service to make sure your blog doesn’t appear by someone who didn’t graduate from Grade 4. I really need this service. 7. A little reminder for people a little obsessed with blogging. ‘Tis fun to do but only in moderation. 8. I usually avoid the Blogging VS Journalism debates as I find they focus on the utterly pointless but did find this quote offered an interesting perspective: “…bloggers who are unconstrained by the cold, objective, impersonal style required by Modern Journalism can more easily present themselves as more credible — sincere, authentic, and vulnerable.” (via The Future of News) […]

2. Riffing on trust — Adrian Monck - 5/20/08

[…] Steve Borriss “Trust in media is about credibility not truth, placing journalists at a disadvantage vs. bloggers” […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: